Friday, December 25, 2009

The Power in Praising People

by Chris Widener
One of the keys to success is to have successful relationships. We are not islands and we don't get to the top by ourselves. And one of the key ways to grow successful in our relationships is to be "life-giving" people to others. Every person we meet, we either give life to or take life from. You know what I mean. There are people who encourage you and when you are done being with them you feel built up. Then there are others who you feel torn down by. Successful people are people who have mastered the art of building others up.

One of the ways we build people up is to praise them. There is power in praising people! Something begins to happen in them, in you, and in your relationship when you praise someone. Remember a time when someone told you something about yourself in a praising manner? It was great, wasn't it? You probably liked that person more after they praised you, didn't you?

Now I am not talking about praising people for the sake of praising people. I am talking about honestly looking for and praising positive character traits and action of others around you. Don't lie to people. If they have done something wrong, correct it, but when they do something right, Praise it!

With that said, here are benefits of and ways to start praising people.

Your relationship grows. Life is about relationships. Family relationships, friends, and co-workers. When we begin to praise people for their positive aspects, our relationships grow. It puts them, and us, on the fast track. Your leadership and influence grows. Who is going to have greater leadership and influence capacity in the lives of their followers, the one who tears down or the one who builds up?

Stronger relationships and loyalty. When the person is appreciated and praised, they become fiercely loyal, because they know that you care for them, love them, and appreciate them. This will take you to success.

Happier, more fulfilled people. I truly believe it is our job to build others up and that they need it. It is a good thing, in and of itself to invest in the lives of others by praising and encouraging them. Even if we never get anything in return, it is the right thing to do to build up other people. Someone else will always come along to tear them down; the successful person will instill in them the power of praise!

Some ways to praise
Character traits. Is there someone you know who is joyful? Hard-working? Honest? Then let them know how much you appreciate that in them. You can do it with a word or a card, or a phone call. Say something like this, "You know Tom, I think it is great that you are such a hard-worker. It seems like you are always the first one here and the last one to leave. You really set a good example and I want you to know how much I appreciate that." Simple!

Same idea as above. "Sue, I don't know if anybody else has told you this, but your work on the Johnson account was excellent. You have a wonderful ability to communicate the vision of the project and that helps all of the rest of us out in our roles and tasks. Thanks for that. It is greatly appreciated."

Other ways you can show praise and appreciation is with a card, a gift, or time off from work.

Make it your goal to praise at least five people a day. If you can, praise ten people a day. Or perhaps you can try to praise everyone you come in contact with. It will take work but it is possible. It just takes discipline and a little work.

Any way you cut it though, there is power in praising people. First for them, then for you!

Monty's notes:
I belong to and train clients at a gym that reminds of the Cheers TV show theme song... Everybody is always glad to see you made it in. How rewarding is that? For many, that is the hardest part of staying on a fitness routine - showing up.

Seratonin is a neurotransmitter in the body responsible for the well being or feel good feeling. It has been proven that simple accepting a compliment or gift of appreciation elevates Seratonin.

Imagine. You have this power in your hands to improve the well-being of those around you which in turn reflects on your improved well-being.

Praise on, praise on!!

Friday, December 18, 2009

Box Jump Hopscotch

Well seems how aerobics is dead, what are we going to do with all those aerobics steps, benches, risers (whatever they call them)?
I know let's get creative and incorporate them into a circuit workout that also includes many other toys in the gym.
So below, is my client Barry (who lost 14 some pounds his first month with me- I didn't realize he had that much to lose). Barry is doing Box Jump Hopscotch. We keep the box height fairly low to keep the foot speed relatively fast.

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Referral Program

Do you know someone looking for a trainer and would like to recommend me? I will now give you incentives for recommending myself to someone, if they sign-up to train with me. My new referral program will reward you for helping me build my cliental. Here is how it works.

For every NEW client you refer to me, I will take $25.00 off your next month billing.

What you need to know / how it works

  • The new client will need to pay the first month & any registration fees that go along with it and sign the contracts before the $25.00 reward shows up on your billing invoice.
  • You can refer as many people as you like. If you refer 4 new clients in a month and they all pay – I will take $100.00 off your next month's bill.
  • If you receive more rewards then your billing, they will carry over to the following months invoice.
  • Invoices will be distributed on the 25th of the month. Any referrals after the 25th will not apply until the next invoicing period.

What I consider a new client

  • Someone who has not trained with me before
  • Someone who signs up for one of the contracted training programs (Email and One-on-One training do not apply)

What you need to tell your friends, family and acquaintances

  • I offer semi-private training. Meaning, I train multiple people at the same time, bouncing from person to person.
  • I have a various contract options including 6 month, 3 month & month to month. Ask me for my current rates! (Also, ask me about my current registration fee special that expires December 31, 2009! Starting January 1, 2010, there will be a $100 registration fee on all new contracts.)

If you ever need marketing materials to give to people, just ask. I have brochures and business cards and throughout the year I also have other flyers with information about training and other programs I offer.

If you have further questions regarding my new referral program, contact me.

Monty Moran

Friday, December 11, 2009

The Formula for Failure and Success by Jim Rohn

Failure is not a single, cataclysmic event. We do not fail overnight. Failure is the inevitable result of an accumulation of poor thinking and poor choices. To put it more simply, failure is nothing more than a few errors in judgment repeated every day.

Now why would someone make an error in judgment and then be so foolish as to repeat it every day? The answer is because he or she does not think that it matters.

On their own, our daily acts do not seem that important. A minor oversight, a poor decision, or a wasted hour generally doesn't result in an instant and measurable impact. More often than not, we escape from any immediate consequences of our deeds.

If we have not bothered to read a single book in the past ninety days, this lack of discipline does not seem to have any immediate impact on our lives. And since nothing drastic happened to us after the first ninety days, we repeat this error in judgment for another ninety days, and on and on it goes. Why? Because it doesn't seem to matter. And herein lies the great danger. Far worse than not reading the books is not even realizing that it matters!

Those who eat too many of the wrong foods are contributing to a future health problem, but the joy of the moment overshadows the consequence of the future. It does not seem to matter. Those who smoke too much or drink too much go on making these poor choices year after year after year... because it doesn't seem to matter. But the pain and regret of these errors in judgment have only been delayed for a future time. Consequences are seldom instant; instead, they accumulate until the inevitable day of reckoning finally arrives and the price must be paid for our poor choices - choices that didn't seem to matter.

Failure's most dangerous attribute is its subtlety. In the short term those little errors don't seem to make any difference. We do not seem to be failing. In fact, sometimes these accumulated errors in judgment occur throughout a period of great joy and prosperity in our lives. Since nothing terrible happens to us, since there are no instant consequences to capture our attention, we simply drift from one day to the next, repeating the errors, thinking the wrong thoughts, listening to the wrong voices and making the wrong choices. The sky did not fall in on us yesterday; therefore the act was probably harmless. Since it seemed to have no measurable consequence, it is probably safe to repeat.

But we must become better educated than that!

If at the end of the day when we made our first error in judgment the sky had fallen in on us, we undoubtedly would have taken immediate steps to ensure that the act would never be repeated again. Like the child who places his hand on a hot burner despite his parents' warnings, we would have had an instantaneous experience accompanying our error in judgment.

Unfortunately, failure does not shout out its warnings as our parents once did. This is why it is imperative to refine our philosophy in order to be able to make better choices. With a powerful, personal philosophy guiding our every step, we become more aware of our errors in judgment and more aware that each error really does matter.

Now here is the great news. Just like the formula for failure, the formula for success is easy to follow: It's a few simple disciplines practiced every day.

Now here is an interesting question worth pondering: How can we change the errors in the formula for failure into the disciplines required in the formula for success? The answer is by making the future an important part of our current philosophy.

Both success and failure involve future consequences, namely the inevitable rewards or unavoidable regrets resulting from past activities. If this is true, why don't more people take time to ponder the future? The answer is simple: They are so caught up in the current moment that it doesn't seem to matter. The problems and the rewards of today are so absorbing to some human beings that they never pause long enough to think about tomorrow.

But what if we did develop a new discipline to take just a few minutes every day to look a little further down the road? We would then be able to foresee the impending consequences of our current conduct. Armed with that valuable information, we would be able to take the necessary action to change our errors into new success-oriented disciplines. In other words, by disciplining
ourselves to see the future in advance, we would be able to change our thinking, amend our errors and develop new habits to replace the old.

One of the exciting things about the formula for success - a few simple disciplines practiced every day - is that the results are almost immediate. As we voluntarily change daily errors into daily disciplines, we experience positive results in a very short period of time. When we change our diet, our health improves noticeably in just a few weeks. When we start exercising, we feel a new vitality almost immediately. When we begin reading, we experience a growing awareness and a new level of self-confidence. Whatever new discipline we begin to practice daily will produce exciting results that will drive us to become even better at developing new disciplines.

The real magic of new disciplines is that they will cause us to amend our thinking. If we were to start today to read the books, keep a journal, attend the classes, listen more and observe more, then today would be the first day of a new life leading to a better future. If we were to start today to try harder, and in every way make a conscious and consistent effort to change subtle and deadly errors into constructive and rewarding disciplines, we would never again settle for a life of existence – not once we have tasted the fruits of a life of substance!

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

The Newsletter

Just a quick FYI. Last August I launched an e-newsletter, which I send additional information separate from my blog postings related to health, fitness, exercise and motivational content to my clients. The original plan was to write quarterly e-newsletters, but as interest increased I moved to writing monthly e-newsletters. Many have referred others to opt-in on receiving my newsletter. Now I open the invitation to all those interested. Just send me an e-mail saying, "Hey Monty! Put me on the list for the newsletter." And then don't forget to tell me your e-mail address where you want it sent. I personally have one e-mail account designated to receiving e-newsletters.

Dedicated to changing lives,

Monty Moran

Sunday, December 6, 2009

Hanging L-Raise

So you think you have abs?
I mean you can do 50 sit-up crunches right? Yeah that's pretty awesome. Congrats!
Now get real.
Mikael gets bored doing full hanging leg raises- where her feet touch the bar she is holding onto with her legs straight the whole time. So we upped it a notch. Stop half way back down and go back up. Is it cheating or easier? Phhht! Hardly! The strength it take to reverse the downward motion and lift back up from an "L-shaped" or 90 degree angle is phenomenal. You won't see many people be able to do this. Probably 5% of your gym's population or less. The other 90% are still doing their killer 50 crunches on the floor. Oh and the remainder 5% can do hanging leg raises and are working on L-raises.

Friday, December 4, 2009

Part I: 124 Ways Sugar Ruins Your Health

By Nancy Appleton, PhD

Well here it is. The first half of the list of what a diet containing excess sugar does to our bodies & minds. Think about what you feed your body. Does it make you look good, feel good or function well? The majority of what ails us can be linked to what we put in our mouths.

The clinical reference sources of each finding are listed at the bottom. Read on...

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.

2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.

3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.

4. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.

5. Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).

6. Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity and function you lose.

7. Sugar reduces high density lipoproteins.

8. Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.

9. Sugar leads to cancer of the breast, ovaries, prostate, and rectum.

10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.

11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.

12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.

13. Sugar can weaken eyesight.

14. Sugar raises the level of neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.

15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.

16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.

17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.

18. Sugar mal-absorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.

19. Sugar can cause premature aging.

20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.

21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.

22. Sugar contributes to obesity.

23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.

24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

25. Sugar can cause arthritis.

26. Sugar can cause asthma.

27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).

28. Sugar can cause gallstones.

29. Sugar can cause heart disease.

30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.

31. Sugar can cause multiple sclerosis.

32. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.

33. Sugar can cause varicose veins.

34. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.

35. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.

36. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.

37. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.

38. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.

39. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E in the blood.

40. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.

41. Sugar can increase cholesterol.

42. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.

43. Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.

44. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs)(Sugar bound non- enzymatically to protein).

45. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.

46. Sugar causes food allergies.

47. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.

48. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.

49. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.

50. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.

51. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA.

52. Sugar can change the structure of protein.

53. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.

54. Sugar can cause cataracts.

55. Sugar can cause emphysema.

56. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.

57. Sugar can promote an elevation of low density lipoproteins (LDL).

58. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.

59. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.

60. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson's disease.

61. Sugar can cause a permanent altering the way the proteins act in the body.

62. Sugar can increase the size of the liver by making the liver cells divide.

63. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.

64. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.

65. Sugar can damage the pancreas.


1. Sanchez, A., et al. "Role of Sugars in Human Neutrophilic Phagocytosis," American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Nov 1973;261:1180_1184. Bernstein, J., et al. "Depression of Lymphocyte Transformation Following Oral Glucose Ingestion." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.1997;30:613.

2. Couzy, F., et al."Nutritional Implications of the Interaction Minerals," Progressive Food and Nutrition Science 17;1933:65-87.

3. Goldman, J., et al. "Behavioral Effects of Sucrose on Preschool Children." Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.1986;14(4):565_577.

4. Scanto, S. and Yudkin, J. "The Effect of Dietary Sucrose on Blood Lipids, Serum Insulin, Platelet Adhesiveness and Body Weight in Human Volunteers," Postgraduate Medicine Journal. 1969;45:602_607.

5. Ringsdorf, W., Cheraskin, E. and Ramsay R. "Sucrose,Neutrophilic Phagocytosis and Resistance to Disease," Dental Survey. 1976;52(12):46_48.

6. Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., and Brownlee, M."Glucose and Aging." Scientific American. May 1987:90.

Lee, A. T. and Cerami, A. "The Role of Glycation in Aging." Annals of the New York Academy of Science; 663:63-67.

7. Albrink, M. and Ullrich I. H. "Interaction of Dietary Sucrose and Fiber on Serum Lipids in Healthy Young Men Fed High Carbohydrate Diets." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:419-428.

Pamplona, R., et al. "Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis." Med Hypotheses. Mar 1993;40(3):174-81.

8. Kozlovsky, A., et al. "Effects of Diets High in Simple Sugars on Urinary Chromium Losses." Metabolism. June 1986;35:515_518.

9. Takahashi, E., Tohoku University School of Medicine, Wholistic Health Digest. October 1982:41.

10. Kelsay, J., et al. "Diets High in Glucose or Sucrose and Young Women." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1974;27:926_936.

Thomas, B. J., et al. "Relation of Habitual Diet to Fasting Plasma Insulin Concentration and the Insulin Response to Oral Glucose," Human Nutrition Clinical Nutrition. 1983; 36C(1):49_51.

11. Fields, M.., et al. "Effect of Copper Deficiency on Metabolism and Mortality in Rats Fed Sucrose or Starch Diets," Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1983;113:1335_1345.

12. Lemann, J. "Evidence that Glucose Ingestion Inhibits Net Renal Tubular Reabsorption of Calcium and Magnesium." Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. 1976 ;70:236_245.

13. Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica. Mar 2002;48;25.

Taub, H. Ed. "Sugar Weakens Eyesight," VM NEWSLETTER;May 1986:6

14. "Sugar, White Flour Withdrawal Produces Chemical Response." The Addiction Letter .Jul 1992:4.

15. Dufty, William. Sugar Blues. (New York:Warner Books, 1975).

16. Ibid.

17. Jones, T. W., et al. "Enhanced Adrenomedullary Response and Increased Susceptibility to Neuroglygopenia: Mechanisms Underlying the Adverse Effect of Sugar Ingestion in Children." Journal of Pediatrics. Feb 1995;126:171-7.

18. Ibid.

19. Lee, A. T.and Cerami A. "The Role of Glycation in Aging." Annals of the New York Academy of Science.1992;663:63-70.

20. Abrahamson, E. and Peget, A.. Body, Mind and Sugar. (New York:Avon,1977.}

21. Glinsmann, W., Irausquin, H., and Youngmee, K. "Evaluation of Health Aspects of Sugar Contained in Carbohydrate Sweeteners. F. D. A. Report of Sugars Task Force." 1986:39.

Makinen K.K.,et al. "A Descriptive Report of the Effects of a 16_month Xylitol Chewing_gum Programme Subsequent to a 40_month Sucrose Gum Programme." Caries Research. 1998; 32(2)107_12.

22. Keen, H., et al. "Nutrient Intake, Adiposity, and Diabetes." British Medical Journal. 1989; 1: 655_658

23. Persson P. G., Ahlbom, A., and Hellers, G. Epidemiology. 1992;3:47-52.

24. Yudkin, J. New York: Sweet and Dangerous.:Bantam Books:1974: 129.

25. Darlington, L., Ramsey, N. W. and Mansfield, J. R. "Placebo_Controlled, Blind Study of Dietary Manipulation Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis," Lancet. Feb 1986;8475(1):236_238.

26. Powers, L. "Sensitivity: You React to What You Eat." Los Angeles Times. (Feb. 12, 1985).

Cheng, J., et al. "Preliminary Clinical Study on the Correlation Between Allergic Rhinitis and Food Factors." Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi Aug 2002;16(8):393-396.

27. Crook, W. J. The Yeast Connection. (TN:Professional Books, 1984)..

28. Heaton, K. "The Sweet Road to Gallstones." British Medical Journal. Apr 14, 1984; 288: 1103_1104.

Misciagna, G., et al. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1999;69:120-126.

29. Yudkin, J. "Sugar Consumption and Myocardial Infarction." Lancet..Feb 6, 1971:1(7693):296-297.

Suadicani, P., et al. "Adverse Effects of Risk of Ishaemic Heart Disease of Adding Sugar to Hot Beverages in Hypertensives Using Diuretics." Blood Pressure. Mar 1996;5(2):91-71.

30. Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease. (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1974).

31. Erlander, S. "The Cause and Cure of Multiple Sclerosis, "The Disease to End Disease." Mar 3, 1979;1(3):59_63.

32. Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease. (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1974.)

33. Cleave, T. and Campbell, G. (Bristol, England:Diabetes, Coronary Thrombosis and the Saccharine Disease: John Wrightand Sons, 1960).

34. Behall, K. "Influ ence of Estrogen Content of Oral Contraceptives and Consumption of Sucrose on Blood Parameters." Disease Abstracts International. 1982;431437.

35. Glinsmann, W., Irausquin, H., and K. Youngmee. Evaluation of Health Aspects of Sugar Contained in Carbohydrate Sweeteners. F. D. A. Report of Sugars Task Force.1986;39:36_38.

36. Tjäderhane, L. and Larmas, M. "A High Sucrose Diet Decreases the Mechanical Strength of Bones in Growing Rats." Journal of Nutrition. 1998:128:1807_1810.

37. Appleton, N. New York: Healthy Bones. Avery Penguin Putnam:1989.

38. Beck_Nielsen H., Pedersen O., and Schwartz S. "Effects of Diet on the Cellular Insulin Binding and the Insulin Sensitivity in Young Healthy Subjects." Diabetes. 1978;15:289_296 .

39. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Aug 2000.

40. Gardner, L. and Reiser, S. "Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate on Fasting Levels of Human Growth Hormone and Cortisol." Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. 1982;169:36_40.

41. Reiser, S. "Effects of Dietary Sugars on Metabolic Risk Factors Associated with Heart Disease." Nutritional Health. 1985;203_216.

42. Hodges, R., and Rebello, T. "Carbohydrates and Blood Pressure." Annals of Internal Medicine. 1983:98:838_841.

43. Behar, D., et al. "Sugar Challenge Testing with Children Considered Behaviorally Sugar Reactive." Nutritional Behavior. 1984;1:277_288.

44. Furth, A. and Harding, J. "Why Sugar Is Bad For You." "New Scientist." Sep 23, 1989;44.

45. Simmons, J. "Is The Sand of Time Sugar?" LONGEVITY. June 1990: 49_53.

46. Randolph, T. G. et al. "Allergic Reactions Following Intravenous Injection of Corn Sugar (Dextrose)". Archives of Surgery. 1950;64:554-564. 47. "Sucrose Induces Diabetes in Cat." Federal Protocol. 1974;6(97).

48. Cleave, T.:The Saccharine Disease: (New Canaan Ct: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1974).131.

49. Ibid. 132.

50. Vaccaro O., Ruth, K. J. and Stamler J. "Relationship of Postload Plasma Glucose to Mortality with 19_yr Follow_up." Diabetes Care. Oct 15,1992;10:328_334.

Tominaga, M., et al, "Impaired Glucose Tolerance Is a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease, but Not Fasting Glucose." Diabetes Care. 1999:2(6):920-924.

51. Lee, A. T. and Cerami, A. "Modifications of Proteins and Nucleic Acids by Reducing Sugars: Possible Role in Aging." Handbook of the Biology of Aging. ( New York: Academic Press, 1990.).

52. Monnier, V. M. "Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process." Journal of Gerontology 1990:45(4 ):105_110.

53. Dyer, D. G., et al. "Accumulation of Maillard Reaction Products in Skin Collagen in Diabetes and Aging." Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1993:93(6):421_22.

54. Veromann, al."Dietary Sugar and Salt Represent Real Risk Factors for Cataract Development." Ophthalmologica. 2003 Jul-Aug;217(4):302-307.

55. Monnier, V. M. "Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process." Journal of Gerontology. 1990:45(4):105_110.

56. Pamplona, R., et al. "Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis." Medical Hypotheses . 1990: 174_181.

57. Lewis, G. F. and Steiner, G. "Acute Effects of Insulin in the Control of Vldl Production in Humans. Implications for Theinsulin-resistant State." Diabetes Care. 1996 Apr;19(4):390-3 R. Pamplona, M. .J., et al. "Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis." Medical Hypotheses. 1990;40:174-181.

58. Ceriello, A. "Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation." Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.

59. Appleton, Nancy. New York; Lick the Sugar Habit. Avery Penguin Putnam, 1988.

60. Hellenbrand, W. "Diet and Parkinson's Disease. A Possible Role for the Past Intake of Specific Nutrients. Results from a Self-administered Food-frequency Questionnaire in a Case-control Study." Neurology. Sep 1996;47(3):644-650. 61. Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., and Brownlee, M. "Glucose and Aging." Scientific American. May 1987: 90.

62. Goulart, F. S. "Are You Sugar Smart?" American Fitness. March_April 1991: 34_38.

63. Ibid.

64. Yudkin, J., Kang, S. and Bruckdorfer, K. "Effects of High Dietary Sugar." British Journal of Medicine. Nov 22, 1980;1396.

65. Goulart, F. S. "Are You Sugar Smart?" American Fitness. March_April 1991: 34_38. Milwakuee, WI,: damage pancreas

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